FCC Considers Fining AT&T for ‘Throttling''

The FCC is considering fining AT&T Inc. for failing to adequately notify customers about reductions in mobile data speeds for some heavy users, a practice known as “data throttling"
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WASHINGTON�The FCC is considering fining AT&T Inc. for failing to adequately notify customers about reductions in mobile data speeds for some heavy users, a practice known as �data throttling,� reports Bloomberg.com.

The FTC accused the company in a 2014 lawsuit of deceiving at least 3.5 million smartphone customers who paid for unlimited data plans and had their transmission speeds drastically reduced. The company disclosed the FCC probe in court documents seeking dismissal of the case. AT&T says the FTC lawsuit deals with the same issues that the FCC is investigating.

The same article goes on to say that AT&T''s �maximum bit rate� program temporarily reduces mobile data speeds for some users to prevent service degradation for all �by preventing heavy users of data from overwhelming the mobile network,� AT&T said in its filings. The program complies with FCC rules, according to AT&T.

�We manage our network resources� in a manner �that is transparent and fully consistent with the FCC''s net neutrality rules,� said Mark Siegel, a spokesman for AT&T.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an Aug. 6 letter told AT&T of his �deep concerns� about data throttling, and �challenged'' the company to justify its treatment of some subscribers. Similar letters were sent to the other three major wireless carriers.

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