Google and AT&T Might Soon Fight It Out in Nashville - Radio Magazine

Google and AT&T Might Soon Fight It Out in Nashville

One Touch Make Ready would make it legal for one contractor to move all the equipment attached to a utility pole
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. � Google�s One Touch Make Ready would make it legal for one contractor to move all the equipment attached to a utility pole.

When a new service provider wants to attach fiber to a utility pole, many cities currently require each company with equipment on that pole to move that equipment to make room for the new entrant; however, the new company has to submit an application to each incumbent asking them to move their equipment, and each incumbent has 60 days to respond.��The requests�often have to be sequential,�meaning that the new company must wait 60 days for one incumbent to move its equipment, and then start the process with the next one, according to�rcrwireless.com.

�The existing system allows incumbents to be a gatekeeper to determine how long and how hard it is for new entrants to come into the marketplace,� said John Burchett, Google�s director of public policy. �If Google Fiber struggles with it, frankly with the deep pockets we�ve got, how in the heck is any smaller new entrant going to do it?� Burchett also said this � is good for communities because it will mean fewer street closures and shorter wait times for those who want high-speed internet from Google Fiber.�

Not surprisingly, one the �incumbents� isn�t particularly interested in letting Google have its way.

AT&T has said that Google�s proposal is a �simplistic solution to a complex problem, and that it is likely to result in service disruptions and safety concerns,� according to the same article. The carrier sued Louisville, Kentucky, after it passed One Touch Make Ready, and has hinted that it may do the same thing in Nashville.

Google recently began slowing down construction of its fiber network because of the number of problems encountered (such as described) and hasstarted to reconsiderwireless internet transmission technologies instead. �

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